Jim Crow Laws During the Great Depression. Journal Entry #3

 

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The Great Depression was a terrible time in the history of the United States. It was time of economical despair. The Jim Crow laws was the worst civil rights violation that did not truly involve slavery. It lasted nearly 75 years, and during that period, these two occurrences ripped apart the deep South of the United States. The Jim Crow Laws and the Great Depression caused some terrible things. This theme is shown deeply in To Kill a Mockingbird, and in real life.

 

The Jim Crow Laws were a set of laws that allowed segregation between blacks and whites, with whites always getting the better end of the deal. These laws were only enacted in the South of the United States. They were used to take away privileges from blacks, such as voting privileges and better facilities for whites. It was first enacted in 1887, and was finally finished during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s. The facilities, in theory, were supposed to be equal, but that was not the case. Whites got considerably better facilities, and the blacks got much worse facilities.

 

The name Jim Crow came from a created character by Americans. He was a dumb, clumsy, and dimwitted black slave, used to enforce these laws.

 

The Jim Crow laws enforced the “American Way of Life:” liberty,, life, and pursuit of happiness. It was just for whites however. The Jim Crow Laws were similar to Hitler’s ‘Master Race.’ They believed that blacks were worse than whites, that they were dumber than whites.

 

The purpose was separation of blacks and whites. Facilities were supposed to be equal, but that never happened. White supremacy was prominent during the time. It was “fair,” but morally incorrect.

 

It was toughest on blacks who lived during the time. Harper Lee shows this beautifully in To Kill a Mockingbird. She shows us the struggle that is needed to survive as a black in the 1930s. Calpurnia, one of the more well-educated blacks in Maycomb County helped the Finches as a cook. It was impossible for any black to get better opportunities than a farm hand, cook, or maid. As shown in Calpurnia’s church, where they do not have enough money to by hymnals, and even if they did, only three or four of them could actually read. It was an overall struggle to live as a black in the Jim Crow Laws.

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